big o graphic

At The Ohana we meet every client where they are at and create an individualized treatment plan that meets their specific needs. We believe that the client is the expert in their lives and we are the experts in various modalities that help them identify problems and create solutions to meet their goals. Our clients can expect compassionate, non-judgmental care from our clinical team. They can expect a whole-person approach where they are heard, seen, and listened to.

The first step we take with every client is completing an assessment during which we collaborate with the patient and create a treatment plan that will most effectively address the patient’s needs. By collaborating with the client, and utilizing a Stages of Change approach, we create a plan that utilizes cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, or psychodynamic therapy.

Overall, our evidence-based treatment modalities seek to understand internal motivation and how we cope with adversity. We look at how thoughts and emotions drive behavior in order to answer the question, “Why do I do what I do?”. Our clients will have five process groups a week, and one and a half individual sessions a week with our clinical staff. We also offer the option of having family sessions.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

About


Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based practice that has shown to have significant, positive results for patients in addiction treatment. CBT focuses on how our thoughts and emotions influence our behaviors. Specifically, it looks at how our negative thoughts trigger emotions and create distorted thinking patterns which negatively influence our behaviors.

Goals


The goal of CBT is to help clients interrupt their thinking patterns and change their behaviors. With substance use disorders specifically, clients are able to interrupt addictive thought patterns and implement new coping strategies to deal with their stress.

How it’s implemented


We begin CBT with an initial assessment to get a sense of the client’s problem areas and create solutions to achieve the client’s goals. We then identify the client’s automatic thoughts, core negative beliefs, and cognitive distortions. We explore why the client thinks they way they do and begin the process of cognitive restructuring. As we identify new ways of thinking, we apply these new thinking patterns to new behaviors. The client learns how to manage sensations of anger, anxiety, and depression and learns how to interrupt negative thought patterns.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

About


Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) is an evidenced-based practice that has been shown to aid the patient in achieving emotional regulation within their life. DBT recognizes that many of our emotional disturbances occur because we are emotionally dysregulated; we experience emotions intensely and they take over.

A major component of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is the concept that two opposing ideas can be present at the same time. In relation to an individual dealing with a substance use disorder, the two thoughts may be, “I want to see my life without the use of drugs,” and “I want to continue getting comfort and relief in the most dependable way I know.” This type of thinking allows us to recognize what is and choose to feed energy into a path that leads to wellness.

Goals


The goal of DBT is to help clients regulate their emotions, tolerate distressful situations, and teach them how to develop skills and boundaries in interpersonal relationships. It is especially helpful with clients that exhibit impulsive behavior. By helping clients experience a sense of validation during times of ambivalence, they are more empowered to choose a pathway that leads to wellness, as opposed to acting impulsively based on an intense emotion and moral judgement.

How it’s implemented


DBT is implemented through mindfulness, emotional regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal skills. Our staff teaches clients to sit in and experience distressful situations and emotions rather than avoiding them. We also teach clients to develop skills and boundaries in their interpersonal relationships; how to speak up if we are often silenced, and how to actively listen if we struggle with hearing what others are saying.

Psychodynamic Therapy

About


Psychodynamic therapy looks at ages, stages, and the family system. In other words, we look at what stage a client is in their lives, what is their chronological age of development, and what role does their family play in their present life. Psychodynamic therapy looks at how various dynamics interrupted, “normal development,” for the client.

Goals


The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to understand how a client came to be who they are and identify what developmental tasks are left to work through. We increase client self-awareness as well as their understanding of how past experiences influence their present behavior. With a psychodynamic foundation, the client begins to take more creative control of their life and maintains a healthy sense of self to prepare them for the future. We affirm who the person is, identify their needs, and identify healthy sources to meet those needs.

How it’s implemented


Psychodynamic therapy is implemented using a variety of methods that create a space of exploration between the therapist, the client,and when applicable, the group. During the sessions we examine how the events of a client’s childhood may have had a great influence on their adult life, ultimately shaping their personality. We examine the developmental tasks in each stage of growth which provides insight into areas of recurring conflict, re-enactment in relationships, and dysfunctional patterns of communication and behavior. Gaining insight into the origins of these patterns then provides an opportunity for behavioral intervention, practice, and change.